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Self Directed Learning

Where Students Find the Freedom to Learn

Defining the University Model &Why it Works-2

Makarios is a progressive private school in Grapevine, TX. We serve families with children ages 5-18 by supporting self-directed learning in an environment that balances freedom and responsibility and prepares young people to thrive in today’s complex world.

You Deserve More Choices in Education

We recognize that many families are deeply dissatisfied with the experience children are having in traditional public and private schools. Often, kids are bright—but bored and not challenged to reach their full potential. They may feel bullied and isolated. Or, they may have been “labeled” with a learning disability or behavior problems.

At Makarios, we see kids as you see them—the way they really are. Naturally talented, accelerated learners, rambunctious and energetic, curious and thoughtful. Above all, diverse and unique. We invite you to visit a community where children can experience education differently.

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The Divide Between Bullying and Conflict

Let’s define the terms.

Conflict can include being rude or mean.

Being rude is when someone is not trying to intentionally hurt the other person. It isn’t a repetitive behavior, and there is not an imbalance of power. For example, Judy asked Martha if she could borrow a pencil. But Martha explained that it wasn’t her pencil, she borrowed it from another friend, so she didn’t want to let Judy use it.

Being mean is when someone is trying to intentionally hurt the other person but they are usually nice, and there is no imbalance of power. For example, if Kyle told Mark that he was a terrible baseball player who should never try out for the baseball team, then Kyle is being mean to Mark.

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The Divide Between Bullying and Conflict

Conflict can include being rude or mean.

Being rude is when someone is not trying to intentionally hurt the other person. It isn’t a repetitive behavior, and there is not an imbalance of power. For example, Judy asked Martha if she could borrow a pencil. But Martha explained that it wasn’t her pencil, she borrowed it from another friend, so she didn’t want to let Judy use it.

Being mean is when someone is trying to intentionally hurt the other person but they are usually nice, and there is no imbalance of power. For example, if Kyle told Mark that he was a terrible baseball player who should never try out for the baseball team, then Kyle is being mean to Mark.

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continue reading →
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The Divide Between Bullying and Conflict

Defining the University Model &Why it Works-2 Let’s define the terms.

Conflict can include being rude or mean.

Being rude is when someone is not trying to intentionally hurt the other person. It isn’t a repetitive behavior, and there is not an imbalance of power. For example, Judy asked Martha if she could borrow a pencil. But Martha explained that it wasn’t her pencil, she borrowed it from another friend, so she didn’t want to let Judy use it.

Being mean is when someone is trying to intentionally hurt the other person but they are usually nice, and there is no imbalance of power. For example, if Kyle told Mark that he was a terrible baseball player who should never try out for the baseball team, then Kyle is being mean to Mark.

view more

continue reading →
1 visits | 0 Comments|Reply

Where Students Find the Freedom to Learn

kids playing

Makarios is a progressive private school in Grapevine, TX. We serve families with children ages 5-18 by supporting self-directed learning in an environment that balances freedom and responsibility and prepares young people to thrive in today’s complex world.

You Deserve More Choices in Education

We recognize that many families are deeply dissatisfied with the experience children are having in traditional public and private schools. Often, kids are bright—but bored and not challenged to reach their full potential. They may feel bullied and isolated. Or, they may have been “labeled” with a learning disability or behavior problems.

At Makarios, we see kids as you see them—the way they really are. Naturally talented, accelerated learners, rambunctious and energetic, curious and thoughtful. Above all, diverse and unique. We invite you to visit a community where children can experience education differently.

  view more continue reading →
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Why Do Kids Love Their Devices?

Before we get into fixing all this, you'll first need to understand why children value their screen time so much.

getting-teens-to-cooperate-with-parents.jpg

 

It's genuinely a rich environment. The evolution of the internet has made it possible to access any information in the history of time within seconds. Memes are the culture of today's generation, knowing the latest update in League of Legends is equivalent to celebrity gossip of the 90s. In almost every area of our lives, we seek instant gratification. Kids find it through their devices. Just with the click of a button or running through a 30-second map, they'll achieve a shiny new trophy. Granted, games such as Minecraft require an enormous amount of patience and planning. 

Variety and novelty are available with new Pokemon coming out every year. New champions come out every month and brand new gaming trends flood the marketplace each day. 

 

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What May or May Not Have Worked

7

Limiting screen time each day. "You have 2 hours of screen time today." This solution may be great for some families, but often it results in children valuing their devices even more.

Taking away their devices as a punishment. Taking away things from a child to discipline them puts the thought in their heads that they can do the same if they want to hurt or punish someone. Forming healthy conflict resolution is imperative to children.

Banning devices from the household. Might very well be a fit for some, but for the majority of the population, it's a bit difficult to go off-grid. Completely giving in and letting them do whatever they want. On the other hand, banning devices may be an easy solution for some. It would mean trading being present and attentive in exchange for being worry free.

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What May or May Not Have Worked

7

Limiting screen time each day. "You have 2 hours of screen time today." This solution may be great for some families, but often it results in children valuing their devices even more.

Taking away their devices as a punishment. Taking away things from a child to discipline them puts the thought in their heads that they can do the same if they want to hurt or punish someone. Forming healthy conflict resolution is imperative to children.

Banning devices from the household. Might very well be a fit for some, but for the majority of the population, it's a bit difficult to go off-grid. Completely giving in and letting them do whatever they want. On the other hand, banning devices may be an easy solution for some. It would mean trading being present and attentive in exchange for being worry free.

view more

continue reading →
1 visits | 0 Comments|Reply

What May or May Not Have Worked

7

Limiting screen time each day. "You have 2 hours of screen time today." This solution may be great for some families, but often it results in children valuing their devices even more.

Taking away their devices as a punishment. Taking away things from a child to discipline them puts the thought in their heads that they can do the same if they want to hurt or punish someone. Forming healthy conflict resolution is imperative to children.

Banning devices from the household. Might very well be a fit for some, but for the majority of the population, it's a bit difficult to go off-grid. Completely giving in and letting them do whatever they want. On the other hand, banning devices may be an easy solution for some. It would mean trading being present and attentive in exchange for being worry free.

view more

continue reading →
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Which of the following statements would motivate you?

1. “You need to quit eating cupcakes and exercise to get rid of your jiggly butt.” - husband to wife

2. “Playing video games all day is a waste of time, and you are getting fat!” - parent to child

3. “I would like you to be able to play with your grandkids and enjoy activities with them when you are older. Isn't that important to you?” - child to parent

4. “How can I support you to get in shape and be healthy?” - friend/mentor

5. “Dude, you are the best lineman we have, you’ve got to stay in shape during the off-season” - teammate/peer

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